Tag Archive for: free

Belonging – A Textile Arts Exhibition with Kimberly Bush, Stephanie Eche, and Traci Johnson

Artist’s Reception – Thursday, October 13, 5-8 pm, RSVP on Eventbrite here.

On View During Open Hours from October 7, 2022 – January 2023 and during ArtsGowanus Open Studios October 15-16.

Hours are subject to change based on OSH events schedule, please refer to the calendar or call to ensure the exhibit will be available at the time of your visit.

 

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION:

Belonging is a contemporary visual art exhibition highlighting 3 Brooklyn artists (Kimberly Bush, Stephanie Eche and Traci Johnson) who create work with fiber, cloth, thread and other textiles.

Textiles are having a “moment” in contemporary art. After decades of being excluded or dismissed as merely utilitarian, textiles are now embraced by major museums, blue-chip galleries and even department store window designers (see Traci Johnson’s recent commission at Bergdorf’s). Why now? Many textile artists use their work to explore healing, trauma and familial or cross-cultural understandings, which seems especially relevant as we transition through the COVID pandemic. Textiles are soft, warm, inviting and represent a feeling of safety to which many people respond immediately. Viewing these intricately woven and mended materials, even without touching, can evoke a sense of home and provide emotional comfort. Belonging taps into that sense of solace, community and joy after a time of grief and sadness.

With common threads, this intergenerational and diverse group of artists weaves together personal meditations that reflect broadly on connectedness, family, community and activism through fiber art. These year(s) of the pandemic have taught us that everything is attached and interconnected, like fibers and fabric. All beings need each other to survive and thrive; we all need to belong.

The rich and varied textures of the textile work on view include knots, tufted rugs, felted wool, and subtle stitches in a mix of natural and bombastic colors. The Old Stone House is a historic home that provides a welcoming backdrop and a contemplative space to discover the fine art handiwork.

 

ABOUT THE ARTISTS:

Kimberly Bush (she/her) is an artist and art therapist with over 30 years experience. Her practice of weaving fibers, mending torn and frayed edges, sewing fabric patches and pieces together, figuratively and literally, demonstrates the interconnectedness among humans. IG @kimberlybrooklyn

Stephanie Eche (she/her) uses found materials and natural fibers to create sculptures that investigate cultural identity, time, and memory. Her processes are intentionally labor and time-intensive, allowing her to reflect on the erasure of indigenous cultures as a result of colonization and capitalism, including the assimilation of her Chicana family. IG @stephanie_eche

Traci Johnson (they/them) is an artist and fashion model who presents bold, colorful abstract sculptural creations that bring a sense of euphoria and vibrant energy to the exhibit. The works embody the texture, softness and comfort of textiles while promoting healing, self-acceptance and self-love; they truly create a safe space for all. IG @kailuaa @rugsbykailuaa

 

ABOUT THE CURATOR:

Grace R. Freedman, PhD (she/her) is a founder of Why Not Art which celebrates the vitality of the Brooklyn arts community by presenting interdisciplinary art shows in alternative spaces to reach expanded and diverse audiences. Contact: grace@whynotart.com; 718-858-4847, IG @whynotartnyc

 

All Artworks are for Sale and a portion of the proceeds support The Old Stone House.

Featured image by Traci Johnson.

This exhibition is made possible, in part, by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

During this music series, families can enjoy performances from award-winning children’s performer Suzi Shelton, coloring and craft activities with Lalo, and giant bubbles by Park Slope Parents.

Presented for free, outdoors in the Park on Thursday mornings from September 8 – October 27.

Please RSVP using this link.

Hosted by Arts Gowanus, Gowanus Open Studios is Brooklyn’s largest celebration of local art and artists.

More than 300 artists, businesses, and venues in Gowanus will open their doors, giving the public a rare glimpse inside the former factories, warehouses, and studio buildings of this vibrant neighborhood.

Artists will be on hand to discuss their work, share their processes, and showcase their latest projects; this event also offers visitors the unique opportunity to purchase work directly from local artists.

Visit the Arts Gowanus website here for the full weekend directory.

 

Artwork on view at OSH this weekend:

Belonging – A Textile Exhibition by Kimberly Bush, Stephanie Eche, and Traci Johnson

Curated by Grace Freedman.

On view indoors at OSH, please note this venue is upstairs and not wheelchair accessible.

Click here to read more about Belonging.

 

Tree Chuang by Xinan Ran

Presented in partnership with Beam Center and Why Not Art.

On view outdoors in the Door Yard at OSH.

Click here to read more about Tree Chuang.

 

4th Avenue Yarn Bomb – A Community Project Celebrating our Neighborhoods

Presented in partnership with Arts Gowanus, Why Not Art, and Forth on Fourth Avenue.

On view outdoors on the 4th Ave fence between 3rd & 4th Streets.

Click here to read more about the Yarn Bomb.

Belonging – A Textile Arts Exhibition with Kimberly Bush, Stephanie Eche and Traci Johnson

Join us for this Artist’s Reception on October 13 from 5-8 pm, please use this link to RSVP on Eventbrite.

The exhibition will be on view during open hours until January 2023 including ArtsGowanus open studios weekend October 15 & 16.

 

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION:

Belonging is a contemporary visual art exhibition highlighting 3 Brooklyn artists (Kimberly Bush, Stephanie Eche and Traci Johnson) who create work with fiber, cloth, thread and other textiles.

Textiles are having a “moment” in contemporary art. After decades of being excluded or dismissed as merely utilitarian, textiles are now embraced by major museums, blue-chip galleries and even department store window designers (see Traci Johnson’s recent commission at Bergdorf’s). Why now? Many textile artists use their work to explore healing, trauma and familial or cross-cultural understandings, which seems especially relevant as we transition through the COVID pandemic. Textiles are soft, warm, inviting and represent a feeling of safety to which many people respond immediately. Viewing these intricately woven and mended materials, even without touching, can evoke a sense of home and provide emotional comfort. Belonging taps into that sense of solace, community and joy after a time of grief and sadness.

With common threads, this intergenerational and diverse group of artists weaves together personal meditations that reflect broadly on connectedness, family, community and activism through fiber art. These year(s) of the pandemic have taught us that everything is attached and interconnected, like fibers and fabric. All beings need each other to survive and thrive; we all need to belong.

The rich and varied textures of the textile work on view include knots, tufted rugs, felted wool, and subtle stitches in a mix of natural and bombastic colors. The Old Stone House is a historic home that provides a welcoming backdrop and a contemplative space to discover the fine art handiwork.

 

ABOUT THE ARTISTS:

Kimberly Bush (she/her) is an artist and art therapist with over 30 years experience. Her practice of weaving fibers, mending torn and frayed edges, sewing fabric patches and pieces together, figuratively and literally, demonstrates the interconnectedness among humans.

Stephanie Eche (she/her) uses found materials and natural fibers to create sculptures that investigate cultural identity, time, and memory. Her processes are intentionally labor and time-intensive, allowing her to reflect on the erasure of indigenous cultures as a result of colonization and capitalism, including the assimilation of her Chicana family.

Traci Johnson (they/them) is an artist and fashion model who presents bold, colorful abstract sculptural creations that bring a sense of euphoria and vibrant energy to the exhibit. The works embody the texture, softness and comfort of textiles while promoting healing, self-acceptance and self-love; they truly create a safe space for all.

 

ABOUT THE CURATOR:

Grace R. Freedman, PhD (she/her) is a founder of Why Not Art which celebrates the vitality of the Brooklyn arts community by presenting interdisciplinary art shows in alternative spaces to reach expanded and diverse audiences.

 

CONTACT:

All Artworks are for Sale and a portion of the proceeds support The Old Stone House.

Grace Freedman, Why Not Art, grace@whynotart.com; 718-858-4847, IG @whynotartnyc

Kim Maier, The Old Stone House, info@theoldstonehouse.org; IG: @oldstonehousebklyn

Kimberly Bush, Artist, IG @kimberlybrooklyn

Stephanie Eche, Artist: IG @stephanie_eche

Traci Johnson, Artist, IG @kailuaa @rugsbykailuaa

 

Featured image by Traci Johnson.

Funding for this exhibition is made possible, in part, by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

Our colleagues at the New Amsterdam History Center present this virtual program by Ross Perlin, co-director of the Endangered Language Alliance.
It is often said that 18 languages were spoken in New Amsterdam. In researching his forthcoming linguistic history of New York, linguist Ross Perlin has discovered that there may have been many more than 18! He suggests a higher count that includes formerly overlooked languages spoken by the Indigenous population and the free and enslaved people brought here from Asia and Africa. He explores how the new port, New Amsterdam, was Native American, African, and European from the beginning, with the template for the city’s extraordinary multilingualism thus set at the very start of Dutch rule.
Ross Perlin (PhD University of Bern) is Co-Director of the Endangered Language Alliance, managing research projects on mapmaking, documentation, policy, and public programming for urban linguistic diversity.  He is a linguist, writer, and translator focused on exploring and supporting linguistic diversity.  He has also written on language, culture, and politics for The New York TimesThe GuardianHarper’s, and elsewhere.  He teaches linguistics at Columbia. In 2021-22 he was a Robert D.L. Gardiner Foundation writing fellow at CUNY’s Gotham Center.

Register here to attend the program on Zoom.

This event was rescheduled from 10/2 due to rain!

The Brooklyn Conservatory Community Orchestra presents Music from the Movies with special guest, soprano Christine Cornell.

This concert will include music from Encanto, West Side Story, The Magnificent 7, Die Hard, Meet Me in St. Louis, The Wizard of Oz, and more!

Presented free, outdoors, and open to the community. Bring your lawn chair or picnic blanket to enjoy the show.

Learn more about BCCO on their website here.

Belonging – A Textile Arts Exhibition with Kimberly Bush, Stephanie Eche, and Traci Johnson

Artist’s Reception – Thursday, October 13, 5-8 pm, RSVP on Eventbrite here.

On View During Open Hours from October 7, 2022 – January 2023 and during ArtsGowanus Open Studios October 15-16.

Hours are subject to change based on OSH events schedule, please refer to the calendar or call to ensure the exhibit will be available at the time of your visit.

 

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION:

Belonging is a contemporary visual art exhibition highlighting 3 Brooklyn artists (Kimberly Bush, Stephanie Eche and Traci Johnson) who create work with fiber, cloth, thread and other textiles.

Textiles are having a “moment” in contemporary art. After decades of being excluded or dismissed as merely utilitarian, textiles are now embraced by major museums, blue-chip galleries and even department store window designers (see Traci Johnson’s recent commission at Bergdorf’s). Why now? Many textile artists use their work to explore healing, trauma and familial or cross-cultural understandings, which seems especially relevant as we transition through the COVID pandemic. Textiles are soft, warm, inviting and represent a feeling of safety to which many people respond immediately. Viewing these intricately woven and mended materials, even without touching, can evoke a sense of home and provide emotional comfort. Belonging taps into that sense of solace, community and joy after a time of grief and sadness.

With common threads, this intergenerational and diverse group of artists weaves together personal meditations that reflect broadly on connectedness, family, community and activism through fiber art. These year(s) of the pandemic have taught us that everything is attached and interconnected, like fibers and fabric. All beings need each other to survive and thrive; we all need to belong.

The rich and varied textures of the textile work on view include knots, tufted rugs, felted wool, and subtle stitches in a mix of natural and bombastic colors. The Old Stone House is a historic home that provides a welcoming backdrop and a contemplative space to discover the fine art handiwork.

 

ABOUT THE ARTISTS:

Kimberly Bush (she/her) is an artist and art therapist with over 30 years experience. Her practice of weaving fibers, mending torn and frayed edges, sewing fabric patches and pieces together, figuratively and literally, demonstrates the interconnectedness among humans. IG @kimberlybrooklyn

Stephanie Eche (she/her) uses found materials and natural fibers to create sculptures that investigate cultural identity, time, and memory. Her processes are intentionally labor and time-intensive, allowing her to reflect on the erasure of indigenous cultures as a result of colonization and capitalism, including the assimilation of her Chicana family. IG @stephanie_eche

Traci Johnson (they/them) is an artist and fashion model who presents bold, colorful abstract sculptural creations that bring a sense of euphoria and vibrant energy to the exhibit. The works embody the texture, softness and comfort of textiles while promoting healing, self-acceptance and self-love; they truly create a safe space for all. IG @kailuaa @rugsbykailuaa

 

ABOUT THE CURATOR:

Grace R. Freedman, PhD (she/her) is a founder of Why Not Art which celebrates the vitality of the Brooklyn arts community by presenting interdisciplinary art shows in alternative spaces to reach expanded and diverse audiences. Contact: grace@whynotart.com; 718-858-4847, IG @whynotartnyc

 

All Artworks are for Sale and a portion of the proceeds support The Old Stone House.

Featured image by Traci Johnson.

This exhibition is made possible, in part, by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.